Interestingly, the walled city has needed very few changes from the time it was planned by Sawai Jai Singh. Even today there is ample room for pedestrian as well as mounted traffic. In the eighteenth century, Jai Singh had decided that the main streets in the city would be approximately 110 feet wide. That is the width of the straight road between the Suraj Pol (Sun Gate in the east) and Chand Pol (Moon Gate in the west). Three major streets of equal width cut across neatly at right angles and divide the area into neat blocks. The three choupars (squares), or intersections thus formed are - Badi Chaupad, Choti Chaupad and Ramganj Chaupad that make highly interesting community and traffic centres. The area is further divided by secondary streets half that width and minor ones that are one fourth of the main artery. Another noteworthy feature that makes Jaipur unique is the fact that because the rulers were great patrons of art and craft, they encouraged craftsmen to come and settle in Jaipur. Specific areas were allocated to potters, stone carvers, dyers, jewellers, painters, kite makers, weavers and so on - a tradition that has survived to this day. Jaipur is still known the world over as a major craft destination and has a mind-boggling range of crafts to offer. It is a favourite not only with the casual shopper but the international design fraternity as well. A lot of major fashion houses head towards Jaipur when they need good quality work done in garments or in furniture, jewellery etc.

From the first ruler of Jaipur (not Amber) Sawai Jai Singh II in 1699 to the tenth Maharaja Man Singh II who died in 1970, each ruler contributed to the city's development, both culturally as well as architecturally. By the time the present Maharaja Brigadier Bhawani Singh came to power in 1970, the curtain had fallen on the golden era of Maharajas and their palaces and power shifted to the democratic government that took over the reigns of the country.

Chandpol Gate

Chandpol Gate